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I Have Astigmatism – Can I Still Wear Contact Lenses?

If you’ve been told you have astigmatism, you may be wondering if contact lenses are for you. Below, you’ll find some information explaining what astigmatism is and which contact lenses are best suited for the condition.

What Is Astigmatism?

Astigmatism is a type of refractive error caused by an irregularly curved cornea. The abnormal cornea causes light to enter unevenly into the eye, which can result in blurred or distorted vision. Other common symptoms of astigmatism include eye strain, headaches, and eye irritation.

Some people are born with this condition, while others may develop it later in life.

Astigmatism typically occurs along with myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness) and can be easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam.

Which Contact Lenses Can I Wear With Astigmatism?

Patients with astigmatism can still wear contact lenses, although usually not standard soft lenses. The two main options for astigmatic eyes are toric lenses and scleral lenses.

What are Toric Lenses?

Rather than having a circular surface like standard contact lenses, toric lenses have an oblong shape designed for astigmatic eyes. Toric lenses are available in both soft and rigid gas permeable (RGP or GP) lens materials.

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses rest over the sclera (the white of the eye) and vault over the cornea (the front surface of the eye). The liquid reservoir between the lens and the cornea provides a continually moist environment that protects the cornea.

Scleral lenses have become an important therapeutic device in the visual rehabilitation of patients with astigmatism and other corneal irregularities. Scleral lenses may offer more comfort and breathability than standard soft contact lenses. They also can provide better visual acuity due to their rigid surface and customized fit. For many patients with astigmatism, scleral lenses have proven to be the optimal solution in providing long-lasting sharp and comfortable vision.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we offer customized scleral lens and toric lens fittings to patients with many types of corneal irregularities, hard-to-fit eyes, or those with dry eye syndrome. To learn more information, call us today or stop by at our Manhattan Beach or Redondo Beach locations.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

Frequently Asked Questions with Michael Hansen O.D.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Redondo Beach, California. Visit Advanced Eyecare Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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How To Prevent Your Lenses From Scratching

If you wear glasses, then you know what a nuisance a scratched lens can be. Scratched or chipped lenses can interfere with your vision, making glasses uncomfortable to wear. Here’s what we recommend to keep your lenses scratch-free.

How to Avoid Scratching Your Lenses

Use a Protective Case

Using a sturdy eyeglass case will prolong the life of your lenses. No matter what kind of glasses you wear — standard, sunglasses, bifocal — you’ll want to protect them.

Be sure to choose a hard case with a soft inner lining and always have one on hand, either in your purse, backpack, or car.

When placing the glasses in their case, make sure the lenses are facing downwards, as this can reduce the risk of them being scratched. Additionally, avoid putting anything else in the case along with the glasses, especially sharp or metal objects.

Choose Anti-Scratch Lenses

Although no lenses are completely scratch-proof, there are certain coatings that can be added to the front and back of your lenses to make them more scratch resistant. Many lenses already come with this option, but sometimes it’s an optional addition. Anti-scratch coatings are particularly helpful for children’s glasses.

Remove Your Glasses Carefully

Handle your glasses by the temples (arms) and not the rims. This way, your fingers avoid the frame and lens area altogether, reducing the chance of inadvertently scratching them. Additionally, holding them by the temples with both hands ensures a better grip, so you’ll be less likely to drop them.

Set Them Down Properly

Never put glasses down with the lenses facing downward, unless it’s into a lens case. If you need to put them down and don’t have a case, rest them with the temples open and upside down — glasses tend to be more stable in this position.

Avoid placing them in a place where they’ll be easily knocked over or splashed on, like near a sink. Setting them down in the same place consistently will also reduce your risk of losing them.

Use the Right Lens Cleaner

It’s all too common for people to wipe their glasses with their clothing or other abrasive material. Doing so can scratch the lenses, especially if they’re dry.

Always clean your lenses with a soft microfiber cloth and specialized lens cleaning solution, items your optometrist’s office can provide.

When to Visit Your Optometrist

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to completely prevent your lenses from ever becoming scratched over their lifetime. Once they are scratched, there is little that can be done to repair the lenses. Most of the time the lenses need to be replaced.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we offer a wide array of frames and lenses, so you’re sure to find a pair to suit your eyes and needs.

Call Advanced Eyecare Center in to schedule your eye exam or with any further questions.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

Frequently Asked Questions with Michael Hansen O.D.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Redondo Beach, California. Visit Advanced Eyecare Center for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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REFERENCES

https://www.southparkoptical.com/how-to-avoid-scratches-on-your-glasses

https://www.allaboutvision.com/eyeglasses/how-to-clean-glasses.htm#:~:text=To%20avoid%20scratches%2C%20blow%20any,you%20clean%20the%20cloths%20frequently

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-remove-scratches-from-glasses

Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: ‘Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you. 

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities. 

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved. 

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else. 

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today. 

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications. 

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health. 

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.  

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Advanced Eyecare Center in Manhattan Beach today.  

Why Do My Contact Lenses Feel So Scratchy?

People always rave about how comfy their contact lenses feel, as if there’s nothing there! So why are yours always aggravating your eyeballs? There’s a number of reasons why this could be happening. Our eye doctor in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach discusses 7 of the most common causes:

1. Something is Stuck

To point out the simplest reason for scratchy contact lenses – something may be stuck on or under your lens. Flecks of mascara are a typical culprit.

2. Dry Eye Syndrome

When your eyes can’t keep themselves moist enough, a variety of symptoms can make a painful appearance. Scratchiness is a typical sign of dry eyes, and contact lenses will only worsen your discomfort. Visit our eye care center in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach for diagnosis and soothing treatment.

3. Allergies

Any allergen, be it pollen or dust, can trigger your eyes to release histamines that cause scratchiness. Contact lenses exacerbate the problem because they trap the offensive irritant close to your eyeball.

4. Poor Fitting Contact Lenses

If your contact lenses aren’t sized correctly for your eyes, you’ll feel it.

5. Blepharitis

Blepharitis is basically a bacterial eyelid infection that’s pretty common. Symptoms include scratchy eyes and eyelids, swollen lids, stinging and crust along your lash line.

6. Corneal Scratch

A corneal scratch (abrasion) can fool people into thinking something is stuck in their eye. Generally, it causes scratchiness, redness, tearing, pain and light sensitivity. Placing contact lenses atop a corneal abrasion can ramp the irritation up a few notches. While most corneal scratches heal on their own, it’s best to be safe and get an eye exam in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach.

7. Corneal Infection

When contact lenses aren’t worn according to schedule or taken care of properly, a dangerous corneal infection (keratitis) can result. Redness, scratchiness, pain and blurred vision are characteristic signs.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

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The Importance of Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Are you planning on wearing contact lenses for the first time? Do you need a new contact lens prescription? Are your current contacts not as comfortable as you wish they were? Your eye doctor will perform a contact lens eye exam to ensure that your vision with contacts is clear, comfortable, and safe, providing you with the right lenses for you.

What is a contact lens exam?

If you wear or want to wear contact lenses, you’ll need an eye exam for contact lenses, in addition to your regular comprehensive eye exam. Special tests are performed during a contact lens exam to evaluate your eyes and vision with contacts.

Are eyeglass prescriptions the same as contact lens prescriptions?

No, a prescription for glasses cannot be used for contact lenses. An eyeglass prescription is for lenses that are positioned approximately 12 millimeters from your eyes, whereas a contact lens prescription is measured for lenses that sit directly on the surface of your eye.

The prescription for contact lenses also includes the brand, lens diameter and curvature, which are not part of an eyeglass prescription.

Contact lenses fitting: One size does not fit all

One contact lens size doesn’t fit all eyes. If a contact lens is too flat or too steep for your corneal shape, you may experience discomfort or even eye damage. Your eye doctor will take certain measurements to determine the best contact lens design and fit for your eyes.

Corneal curvature

This measures the curvature of your eye’s clear front surface (cornea) so the eye doctor can select the optimal curve and diameter for your contact lenses. If your eye’s surface is somewhat irregular because of astigmatism or other conditions, you may require a special lens.

Pupil and iris size

The size of your pupil and iris (the colored part of your eye) is also important in determining the best contact lens design.

Tear film evaluation

This test evaluates the quality of your tears, to determine whether they will be able to keep contact lenses and your cornea sufficiently hydrated throughout the day. If you have dry eye disease, standard contact lenses may not be right for you.

Trial lenses

Following the eye exam, you will be provided with trial lenses to verify that the chosen contact lenses offer clear and comfortable vision. This will allow the eye doctor to make any fine adjustments to the prescription.

Contact Lens Eye Exam Near You

Wearing the correct contact lenses for your eyes allows you to enjoy all of the benefits of wearing contacts, while keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable.

If you’re already a contact lens wearer, visit your eye doctor at least once a year to make sure the lenses are still providing you with optimum vision and comfort.

Contact Advanced Eyecare Center in Manhattan Beach to book your contact lens eye exam today!

Can You See Better with Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

The choice whether to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses doesn’t usually have a clear cut answer. Many considerations should be weighed into your decision, including your vision prescription and lifestyle requirements. For help with making the right choice, book a consultation with our eye doctor in Manhattan Beach or Redondo Beach. At Advanced Eyecare Center, we understand this is not a decision to be taken lightly, and we’ll help guide you towards the right option to meet your needs.

Eyeglasses and contact lenses have different characteristics and their own unique pros and cons. For example, some people find their vision to be clearer and crisper with contacts. Our optometrist explains this particular issue:

Contacts are worn closer to your eye

Even though contact lenses have the same lens and focusing power as glasses, they are worn much closer to your eyes. This means they bend light in a way that meets your prescription much more precisely. That’s why if you switch back and forth between contact lenses and eyeglasses, you’ll have slightly sharper visual acuity with your contacts.

Contacts aren’t exposed to the elements

Eyeglasses are constantly bombarded with airborne dirt and debris, smeared by fingerprints, and getting scratched when taken on and off. They also fog up with temperature changes and catch the glare of lights. All of these factors play a role in reducing visual clarity with eyeglasses versus contact lenses.

Contact lenses don’t limit your vision

Eyeglasses have frames, which can be restrictive – putting a border on your field of vision. In contrast, contact lenses offer a wider field of view. They move with your eye, so nothing blocks your line of sight. This is particularly beneficial when playing sports.

Want to see for yourself if contact lenses give superior visual clarity? Schedule an eye exam in our Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach optometry offices.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

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New To Contact Lenses? Here Are Our Top 5 Tips!

For an estimated 56 million North Americans, contact lenses are the preferred form of vision correction. So if you’ve just started wearing contact lenses — you’re in good company.

Advice About Contact Lenses from Manhattan Beach Eye Doctor: Dr. Hansen

Here are 5 tips to quickly help you adjust to wearing and caring for your new lenses so you can enjoy the many benefits they offer.

  1. Learn How to Tell if Your Contact Lens Is Inside Out

This is a common mistake many beginners make when inserting soft contacts. Place the lens on  your index fingertip and look carefully at its shape. The edge of the lens should be pointing upwards, like the rim of a teacup. If the edge is flared outward like a blooming flower, the lens is inside out.

Some contact lenses have tiny laser markings of numbers or letters. If the numbers/letters read correctly when you hold the lens on your fingertip, they are properly oriented and the lens is ready to be inserted.

  1. Never Use a Substitute for Contact Lens Solution

Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate contact lens solution to suit your eyes and lenses. Some people have sensitivities and not all lens solutions are the same. 

Even if you run out of contact lens solution, don’t be tempted to rinse your lenses with water, and never use saliva to moisten or clean them.

Using substances other than the recommended contact lens solution to rinse or rewet your contacts can introduce harmful microbes to the eye and cause a serious infection. That’s why it’s best to remove your contacts before showering, swimming, or any other time they might get wet.

  1. If Your Contact Lenses Feel Uncomfortable, Take Them Out!

Some newcomers mistakenly think that if their contacts feel uncomfortable or gritty, they simply need to “get used to them.” Contact lenses are supposed to be comfortable, so if you are experiencing discomfort there may be something wrong.

With clean fingers, remove your contacts and rinse them, inside and out, with the solution or rewetting drops as recommended by your eye doctor. Dust or dirt could have gotten stuck between the lens and your eye, causing irritation. Flushing the lenses with contact lens solution will help remove the irritant.

If your eyes still feel irritated, don’t place the contact lenses back in your eyes. Instead, wait until they are no longer red or irritated, and try inserting them again. If the problem persists, contact your eye doctor.

  1. Wear Contact Lens-Friendly Makeup

Wearing makeup around the eyes can be a source of irritation and infection whether you wear contact lenses or not. Here’s what we recommend when it comes to eye makeup and contact lenses:

  • Choose hypoallergenic makeup.
  • If using a cream-based product around your eyes, choose a water-based formula instead of an oil-based one. 
  • Keep your eye closed during application to avoid makeup particles entering your eye. 
  • Don’t apply eyeliner or eyeshadow to the inner rims of your eyelids.
  • Replace eye makeup at least once every 3 months to minimize the growth and spread of bacteria.
  • Never share eye makeup with friends or family.
  • Remove your contact lenses before removing your makeup.
  1. Stick to the Hygiene Guidelines

We can’t emphasize this enough — always thoroughly wash and dry your hands before handling your contact lenses.

Try to avoid washing your hands with oily or heavily scented hand soaps, as they tend to cling to the surface of the lens and could irritate the eye. Additionally, if you touch moisturizers or lotions before handling your contact lenses you run the risk of some residual product adhering to the lens and clouding your vision.

After washing your hands, dry them using a lint-free towel. It’s harder to grasp contact lenses with wet hands, and — as mentioned above — lenses shouldn’t come into contact with tap water.

Bonus Tip: Get an Eye Exam

While all this advice can be very helpful, it doesn’t replace an in-person exam with your eye doctor.  Your eye doctor will advise you when to return for your next contact lens consultation. Following this schedule is the best way to ensure you can enjoy the freedom of contact lens wear.

If you are new to contact lenses (or not!) and have any questions or concerns about your eyes or vision, call 310-620-1345. Advanced Eyecare Center will be happy to schedule you for a contact lens exam and fitting.

With the help of Dr. Hansen, you’ll be an expert in contact lens wear and care in no time!

Can You See Better with Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

The choice whether to wear eyeglasses or contact lenses doesn’t usually have a clear cut answer. Many considerations should be weighed into your decision, including your vision prescription and lifestyle requirements. For help with making the right choice, book a consultation with our eye doctor in Manhattan Beach or Redondo Beach. At Advanced Eyecare Center, we understand this is not a decision to be taken lightly, and we’ll help guide you towards the right option to meet your needs.

Eyeglasses and contact lenses have different characteristics and their own unique pros and cons. For example, some people find their vision to be clearer and crisper with contacts. Our optometrist explains this particular issue:

Contacts are worn closer to your eye

Even though contact lenses have the same lens and focusing power as glasses, they are worn much closer to your eyes. This means they bend light in a way that meets your prescription much more precisely. That’s why if you switch back and forth between contact lenses and eyeglasses, you’ll have slightly sharper visual acuity with your contacts.

Contacts aren’t exposed to the elements

Eyeglasses are constantly bombarded with airborne dirt and debris, smeared by fingerprints, and getting scratched when taken on and off. They also fog up with temperature changes and catch the glare of lights. All of these factors play a role in reducing visual clarity with eyeglasses versus contact lenses.

Contact lenses don’t limit your vision

Eyeglasses have frames, which can be restrictive – putting a border on your field of vision. In contrast, contact lenses offer a wider field of view. They move with your eye, so nothing blocks your line of sight. This is particularly beneficial when playing sports.

Want to see for yourself if contact lenses give superior visual clarity? Schedule an eye exam in our Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach optometry offices.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

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What’s Better – Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

Our optician in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach reviews the pros and cons of both types of vision correction.

Asking whether glasses or contact lenses are better is similar to asking what flavor is best – apple or orange? Some people like glasses, others prefer contact lenses, and many others who need vision correction keep both types around and choose their eyewear depending on their daily plans.

Eyeglasses and contact lenses alike can help resolve vision conditions such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. The eyewear that’s right for you will support your vision prescription, daily activities, personal preferences, and comfort with taking minor risks. At our optical stores in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach, California, we offer a wide range of eyeglasses and contact lenses. Our optician will discuss your personal needs to help you make the right decision. At Advanced Eyecare Center, we aim to give everyone sharp, healthy vision, with no agenda other than to provide you with the best eyewear for your eyes and lifestyle.

All you need to know about eyeglasses

Pros:

  • Glasses involve a one-time investment and no longstanding expenses. Maintenance of eyeglasses is minimal and usually means just rinsing them regularly with glass cleaner. Unless your vision changes, it’s not typically necessary to replace the lenses.
  • The risk of eye infection is lower with glasses. As opposed to contact lenses that rest on the eye surface, glasses sit in front of the eye and don’t make contact with your eyeball.
  • Glasses with UV protection block harmful UV sun rays more efficiently than contact lenses with built-in UV protection, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
  • Some people prefer the way they appear in eyeglasses, claiming they project a more intelligent, serious look.
  • Glasses frames come in a wide variety of designs, giving you the chance to make a fashion statement, as well as accessorize your outfit with your eyewear.

Cons:

  • Glasses don’t always suit an active lifestyle. It can get irritating to be constantly pushing your glasses up your sweaty nose.
  • When playing sports, glasses don’t provide full peripheral vision, and you need to turn your head to see what’s on your sides clearly.
  • Glasses don’t always match your outfit or coordinate with the statement you want to make with your appearance.

All you need to know about contact lenses

Pros:

  • Contact lenses are ideal for an active lifestyle, offering convenience, comfort, superior vision clarity, and a wider peripheral view than glasses.
  • Even when engaging in vigorous activity, contact lenses don’t fall, bounce or slip down your nose. Also, they don’t get in the way of wearing safety gear, such as helmets.
  • If you prefer the look of your bare, natural face, contacts don’t change your appearance.
  • Always dream of a different color eyes? Colored contact lenses can transform your look.
  • Driving can be easier with contact lenses, especially for people who drive for a living and rely heavily on peripheral vision.
  • If you have severe astigmatism, some types of contact lenses can reshape your eye surface to provide crisper vision than eyeglasses.
  • Contacts don’t fog up when you move between different weather conditions or environments.

Cons:

  • Contacts must be maintained and disinfected properly or you risk eye infections. Disposable daily contact lenses can eliminate this disadvantage, as long as you are vigilant about discarding your contacts at the end of each day.
  • If you do not have disposable contact lenses, you’ll need to buy a case and cleansing solutions.
  • The lifespan of contact lenses is generally shorter than that of eyeglasses, so you’ll need to buy replacement pairs more frequently.
  • Dry eye sufferers may find that contact lenses irritate their condition.

Eye exams and your eyewear

No matter what you choose, eyeglasses or contact lenses, remember that you need to visit your eye doctor for regular follow-up eye exams! Contact our optical store to book an appointment.

If you wear eyeglasses and find that the fit has changed, please visit our optician in Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach, California, so we can assess the fit and make any necessary adjustments to your frames.

At Advanced Eyecare Center, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 310-620-1345 or book an appointment online to see one of our Manhattan Beach eye doctors.

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Don’t Do These 11 Things If You Wear Daily Disposable Contacts!

Countless people around the world wear daily disposable contact lenses or dailies. These popular single-use lenses are removed and discarded at the end of each day, and a new, fresh pair is inserted the next morning. Used properly, dailies promote eye health, and they’re comfortable and convenient.

Despite the many advantages associated with wearing daily disposables, there are plenty of ways you can damage your eyes and vision — some you may never have considered.

1. Don’t Touch Contacts with Dirty Hands

Before touching your lenses, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. By touching your contact lenses with dirty hands, you transfer bacteria to your lenses, which can lead to an infection. Preferably dry your hands with a disposable paper towel rather than a cloth towel, and ensure that no remnants of the towel remain on your fingers.

2. Don’t Expose Your Contacts to Water

Any source of water, whether tap, pool, or lake water, can change the shape of your lenses and cause micro-abrasions on your cornea. Plus, the water may contain bacteria that can wreak havoc on your eye health and cause you to experience temporary vision loss or even permanent blindness.

If you must get in the water with your contacts on, make sure to wear waterproof goggles. If you do get water on your contact lenses, dispose of these lenses and insert a new pair. Exposing contact lenses to chemicals like chlorine binds to the lens and cannot be cleaned off. It then leeches onto the cornea and causes irritation.

The next time you’re tempted to swim or shower with your lenses on, think twice before doing so.

3. Don’t Reuse Your Contacts

Daily disposable contacts are designed to be thrown away after every single use, and people who reuse them risk painful and risky outcomes. Dailies are thinner, more fragile, and don’t hold moisture as well as other contacts.

Users sometimes attempt to increase the lifespan of these lenses by cleaning them in a disinfecting solution and wearing them for several days or even weeks at a time. This is problematic, as the lens material doesn’t allow for repeated disinfecting. In fact, the process of cleaning the lenses tends to be not only ineffective but also breaks down the lens itself, increasing the risk of the lens falling apart while in the eye. The risk of complications and infection is not worth the few saved bucks.

4. Don’t Insert a Dropped Contact In Your Eye

One of the perks of daily lenses is that they are less expensive (per lens) than other types of contacts. So if you find yourself dropping a lens into the sink or on the floor, don’t bother placing it back in your eye. Doing so can cost you your eye health.

5. Don’t Ever Put Contacts In Your Mouth

It seems like a funny concept, doesn’t it? You wouldn’t believe the number of people who do this. If you drop a contact lens, avoid rooting around the floor trying to find it, and if you do, definitely don’t put it in your mouth to lubricate it. Your mouth contains bacteria that can infect your eyes once you reinsert your contacts.

Play it safe by carrying around an emergency pair of glasses or an extra pair of daily disposable contacts in your bag, your car, or at work.

6. Don’t Overwear Your Daily Lenses

Wearing your lenses for long periods of time can damage your eyes, even if they’re daily contacts. The maximum recommended daily use for any contact lens is 14-16 hours, though Dr. Hansen will determine the exact number of hours you should wear your lenses. Your eyes, just like any other part of your body, need to rest. Your corneas receive oxygen from the air, not from blood vessels, and while it’s healthy to wear contacts during the day, wearing them for extended periods can significantly reduce the amount of oxygen your eyes receive, which can lead to complications. If you don’t give your eyes the rest they need, your corneas might get swollen, which can lead to corneal abrasion and even bacterial infection.

7. Don’t Sleep With Your Lenses

Daily lenses should never be worn overnight. You’re risking your sight by sleeping in a lens that’s not approved for overnight use, as it can lead to ocular irritation, swelling and corneal ulcers.

8. Don’t Insert Contacts Before Completing Your Morning Routine

Avoid inserting your contacts before you shower or wash your face, since you risk exposing your lenses to tap water and the bacteria that come with it. We also recommend that you insert your lenses after blow-drying and styling your hair, especially if you’re using hairspray or other aerosols, as these products can dry out your contacts. Additionally, the spray can coat the lenses and leave a film that not only irritates the eyes, but can make it difficult to see. If you’re at the hairdresser’s and cannot remove your lenses, shut your eyes when spray is applied.

9. Don’t Get Makeup On Your Contacts

Insert your contacts before applying makeup, because any makeup residue on your hands, such as mascara, can easily transfer to your lenses.

It’s not uncommon for people to get concealer, eyeliner or mascara on their contact lenses. If that happens, immediately remove the lens and clean the makeup with solution (while making sure to dispose of the lens before bed). Otherwise, simply replace with another lens. Avoid wearing waterproof makeup, since it can’t always be removed from your lenses, even when rinsed with solution.

To prevent makeup from getting on your lenses, don’t apply mascara all the way from the base of your lashes up. Instead, apply it from the midway point. It’s also important not to apply eyeliner on the inner lid of your eye, but rather to the skin above your lashes.

10. Don’t Wear Contact Lenses If Your Eyes Are Irritated

As the saying goes, “if in doubt – take them out!” If your eyes feel irritated, uncomfortable, or if you notice any pain or redness, don’t power through. If your symptoms last a while, contact Dr. Hansen at Advanced Eyecare Center. You don’t want to let a serious infection go unchecked.

When your eyes feel more rested and are free of discomfort, put in a fresh pair of contacts.

11. Don’t Rub Your Eyes

If your eyes feel itchy or dry, or if a lens feels out of place, you may be tempted to rub your eyes. But rubbing, whether with contacts or without, can lead to long-term ocular issues. This may cause you to experience blurred vision, and may even damage your cornea. Instead, Dr. Hansen can recommend eye drops to relieve any discomfort. Make sure to apply them only when contact lenses are removed.

Above, we have delved into things you should never do with daily contact lenses. Fortunately, if you do make a mistake, you can remove the lens and replace it with a fresh one. The few dollars you might save by not opening a new pack aren’t worth the damage a mistake can cause.

 

If you have any questions or are interested in finding out more about contact lenses, contact Advanced Eyecare Center in Manhattan Beach today. Dr. Hansen will be happy to explain how to care for your eyes and maintain your vision.

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